ESL Job Feed is the most eclectic and broad source of ESL jobs and teaching positions available worldwide.?ESL Job Feed publishes links to ESL Job postings from a variety of sources including TESall, Total ESL, Yahoo!/Monster, Guardian Jobs, Chronicle of Higher Education, craigslist, TESOL Org, TEFL and many more. From conversation schools for beginners to university positions for teaching veterans,?ESL Job Feed is your source for English teaching positions worldwide.


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So you just attained your teaching degree and now it is that time to look out for a job, or you are already teaching but you are looking for a new challenge. Well finding a new job is very tiring and you obviously need to be fully prepared. Chances of getting an English teaching position can be very minimal and the ones available have a lot of competition. Prepare yourself thoroughly when getting into this phase of job searching. The following are a few steps to follow and you will be on your way to landing your long awaited job opportunity.

As a certified teacher, opportunities are plentiful, you just need to know where to look. In the digital age, all facets of employment are moving online, as such, it presents you with the unique opportunity to teach online from the comforts of your own home. The openings are diverse and virtually limitless; from joining an established teaching company, to self-employment, you could do it all. All it takes is laying down the groundwork by learning the pertinent information and being thorough with your approach. Use all of the resources available to you, including; employment websites, freelancing, networking, blogging, and various digital platforms to increase your scope and reach a greater target audience.

As an ESL teacher, it is common to feel as if there aren’t enough hours in the school day to get through an entire ESL lesson, let alone guide students through the central concepts and themes of a unit. There is always something unexpected arising to dampen your well-orchestrated ESL lesson plans. We all know the importance of repetitive, engaging activities on the language learning process. It was a concept first illustrated by John Carroll’s 1963 study, through which the researcher demonstrated a significant correlation between learning and time spent actively engaged in the learning process. Over the ensuing decades, further studies have confirmed the importance of time spent on task.

Communication is the cornerstone to effectively teaching younger students. However, when teaching ESL abroad, cultural barriers may stand in your way of successfully reaching your students. It is important to remember that every situation is unique and social norms differ between societies, sometimes even within the same nation. Politics, religion, and urbanization all play a crucial role in determining a society’s values and it is up to you to learn the ins and outs of a society prior to embarking on your journey of teaching there. This helpful guide will highlight some of the larger issues you should closely examine to best be successful overseas.

While teaching English as a second or foreign language is a very worthwhile and fulfilling profession for many practitioners, it also causes work-related stress just as much as any other career. Just about any unwanted situation, such as misbehaving students, substandard accommodations and inconsiderate local colleagues can trigger an English teacher?s stress levels to shoot up. Once this happens, there is a higher likelihood that the teacher?s enthusiasm and energy levels will dramatically go down.

English language learning around the world is evolving in surprising and sometimes alarming ways. A few decades ago, the language learning process was either moderated by native speakers (NS) of English or proactively initiated by second language learners who travel to English-speaking countries to study and become proficient in the language. In many language encounters, English translators were also in high demand to facilitate a clearer communication between peoples of diverse linguistic traditions. This is not to say that formal English language teachers and translators have become relics belonging to a bygone era. On the contrary, their function is still very much relevant, but their roles are changing dramatically.

Given the status of English as the lingua franca for global business, the demand for English teachers in countries where it is not the primary language is expectedly on the rise. For people who intend to make a career out of teaching English overseas, doing so in Asia can be an exciting and rewarding experience. According to some job market analysts, Asian countries offer among the best career opportunities for teachers of English as a second language (ESL). Reportedly, job pay and availability is very attractive in Asia especially for adventurous educators who are open to being immersed in different cultural environments. Without any exaggeration, just about any country in Asia has an opening for the enterprising English language educator.

Many native speakers of English are considering a fulfilling career as language educators in Asia. This is not surprising at all, given the high demand for ESL/EFL teachers in the thriving economies of the region and the reeling job market at the home front. In fact, quite a number of people from the US, UK, Australia, and other English-speaking countries have already made the decision to leave their home nations and seek more satisfying careers elsewhere in Asia.

With its rich culture, versatile landscapes and delicious cuisines, Latin America is arguably one of the best regions in the world to visit or live.  Regardless of your age, financial status, or nationality, there is something in Central and South America for you.  Here is why we think everyone should live (or visit) Latin America at least once in their lives.

So you got your ESL certification and you are ready to go.  Now comes the hard part – getting a job.  But fear not!  ESL Jobs Feed Overseas is here to provide you with resources and guidance to land you that dream job overseas.  As with any job, here or abroad, your resume is usually your first point of contact with potential employers, so you need to make it count.  Since you will be applying for jobs overseas, you will want to make an international resume, which is slightly different than what we use in the US.  Check out this portion of our sample international resume.