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Making Comparisons in English There are several ways to make effective comparisons in English. Using these expressions with animals is one of the more interesting and colorful ways to do so. Here are some of the more common metaphors and similes in colloquial use. "Big as a Whale" With some species weighing up to 180 tons (200 short tons) and measuring up to 98 ft. (30 meters) in length, whales are some of the largest animals currently known to man. "Blind as a Bat" While not quite true, bats are not really blind. They are simply adapted to avoiding obstacles and finding prey or food in nearly


So here's another example of a short paragraph story which I've used to teach pronunciation of the past tense in English using regular verbs. Admittedly, it takes some thought to write one of these but the effort is worth it since the learners seem to enjoy this form of grammar in context. Normally, a passage would contain a mix of both regular and irregular verbs in English. However, when practicing the -ed, -d, -ded, and -ted endings pronunciation, these types of exercises can prove to be invaluable. A short paragraph story of this type is much more difficult to pronounce and causes the spe


English verbs - no more complications! In short, what do you need to know?


English tenses have proven themselves to be one of the most confusing subjects for an English learner. But they don't have to be. Here is a simple and practical explanation.


Homophones are words that have exactly the same sound (pronunciation) but different meanings and (usually) spelling.


Nothing pure about it--English I mean. After all, the British Isles were invaded several times, as when, during the 5th century, the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes arrived, pushing out Celtic in favor of their Germanic tongue.